Uk news Tomorrow Will Be A Good Day by Captain Tom Moore: upbeat and engaging London news

MetiNews.Com - Captain Tom Moore can’t believe his luck. At 100 years old, this “quiet little soul”, as he describes himself in this autobiography, has become a national hero, admired by both the Queen and Piers Morgan.

Uk news Tomorrow Will Be A Good Day by Captain Tom Moore: upbeat and engaging London news

MetiNews.Com - Captain Tom Moore can’t believe his luck. At 100 years old, this “quiet little soul”, as he describes himself in this autobiography, has become a national hero, admired by both the Queen and Piers Morgan.

Uk news  Tomorrow Will Be A Good Day by Captain Tom Moore: upbeat and engaging London news
17 September 2020 - 09:16

Breaking News ! ES Lifestyle newsletter The latest lifestyle, fashion and travel trends Enter your email address Continue Please enter an email address Email address is invalid Fill out this field Email address is invalid You already have an account. Please log in. Register with your social account or click here to log in I would like to receive trends and interviews from fashion, lifestyle to travel every week, by email Update newsletter preferences Captain Tom Moore can’t believe his luck. At 100 years old, this “quiet little soul”, as he describes himself in this autobiography, has become a national hero, admired by both the Queen and Piers Morgan. “All I did was go for a walk,” he writes. But his simple act of walking 100 laps of his garden before his hundredth birthday on April 30 to raise money for the NHS caught the public imagination at a time when the world was in dire need of positive news. Moore raised nearly £33 million, recorded a charity cover single of You’ll Never Walk Alone, becoming the oldest person to get a UK number one, and in July he was knighted. Not bad for someone who claims not to understand what a celebrity is. This autobiography, which was put together in record time (hats off to ghost-writer Wendy Holden) is a chance to raise even more money for the charity he has set up, the Captain Tom Foundation. It is also his manifesto, a lesson in resilience and weathering bad patches. Before you even get to the walk, Moore’s life story is worth reading as a record of oral history. He is old enough for this not to have been his first pandemic. He was born just as Spanish Flu was easing, in the year Rupert Bear was created and has lived through the Second World War, the first moon landing, the swinging sixties and the fall of the Berlin Wall. Unfortunately, the first half of the book feels contrived. Moore spends a long time giving a remarkably detailed account of his childhood – he chronicles every moment, a bit like Yorkshire’s version of Karl Ove Knausgård.

. More interesting is how he came to appreciate the value of patience, growing up with a deaf father, and the beginnings of his affection for the NHS. When Moore was young he was hospitalised with scarlet fever and speaks of how much he admired the nurses who treated him. Read more Captain Tom Moore to release autobiography and children’s book The outbreak of World War Two was the most exciting thing to happen to “young Tommy Moore” as he calls himself. He was thrilled to be sent to India at 22. Mostly he hung around the camps, telling Indian people the right way to make porridge, fixing cars (his obsession) and occasionally meeting women. If you are looking for war stories you will be disappointed, it mostly reads more like an account of a gap year. Finally he sees some action, in Burma, but at 29 he is back in Keighley in his childhood bedroom trying to rescue his father’s building company and find a girlfriend. Perhaps because Moore is now a benign grandfather figure it feels wrong to read him lusting after women or saying that even when his first wife Billie was depressed, she looked terrific in her fashionable miniskirt (despite this he sees himself as a feminist because he is one of the few men of his generation who can cook, and even shares a recipe for oat biscuits). But he writes honestly about his divorce, wooing his second wife Pamela, and bringing up their daughters. The more recent passages are more engaging. Moore movingly describes his feelings about Pamela’s dementia and expresses frustration at his own ageing. Despite a baggy, saccharine start, it is hard to criticise a man who has done so much good. His upbeat nature shines through and reminds us how much worse this year would have been without him. Tomorrow Will Be A Good Day by Captain Tom Moore (Michael Joseph, £20), buy it here.

Source = MetiNews.Com

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Uk news Tomorrow Will Be A Good Day by Captain Tom Moore: upbeat and engaging London news


Uk news Tomorrow Will Be A Good Day by Captain Tom Moore: upbeat and engaging London news


Uk news Tomorrow Will Be A Good Day by Captain Tom Moore: upbeat and engaging London news


Uk news Tomorrow Will Be A Good Day by Captain Tom Moore: upbeat and engaging London news

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