UK news Rachel Dean's Big Ask: U105 presenter Cate Conway on losing Stephen Clements and how he was her biggest influence last news

MetiNews.Com - In this week's interview Rachel Dean talks to U105 presenter Cate Conway, (44) who lives in Dunmurry. Alongside business partner Saima Akram, she is the co-founder of Quirky Weddings, which helps local couples track down quality supplies for their big days.

UK news Rachel Dean's Big Ask: U105 presenter Cate Conway on losing Stephen Clements and how he was her biggest influence last news

MetiNews.Com - In this week's interview Rachel Dean talks to U105 presenter Cate Conway, (44) who lives in Dunmurry. Alongside business partner Saima Akram, she is the co-founder of Quirky Weddings, which helps local couples track down quality supplies for their big days.

UK news  Rachel Dean's Big Ask: U105 presenter Cate Conway on losing Stephen Clements and how he was her biggest influence  last news
01 July 2020 - 09:08

Breaking News ! "In this week's interview Rachel Dean talks to U105 presenter Cate Conway, (44) who lives in Dunmurry. Alongside business partner Saima Akram, she is the co-founder of Quirky Weddings, which helps local couples track down quality supplies for their big days. A. I grew up in Carryduff. My mum and dad still live in my childhood house - they've lived there for about 47 years.I have one brother, Mark, who is three years older than me. We were quite close, but it's funny because we're very different people. You would nearly think we weren't brother and sister - there's barely any similarity. He looks really like my mum and I look like my dad.My dad, Roy, worked in property and land services, so he surveyed land and stuff like that. It was nice because he worked a 9-5 job, so in the evenings and weekend he was all ours.He was brilliant that way. He was always there and would have taken us swimming or ice-skating. He would always take us on activities he was doing as well.My mum, Maura, was a hairdresser until my brother was born, then she looked after us, but the hairdressing never went away - she always cut our hair and cut my granny's hair.My mum and dad were really keen on family days out and we mostly went to Newcastle and Dundrum.I have really happy memories of long days walking along the beach and my granny being there. She would bring a wee gas stove and cook sausages. I have lovely memories of sitting with my granny, eating sausage sandwiches.I spent a lot of my childhood drawing and making things. I'm the kind of person who doesn't like to be bored and I was like that even as a child.My mummy would never throw out a milk carton or a cereal box or anything like that. It was all kept for me because I would turn it into something - into some crazy doll's house or something. I was very able to entertain myself that way.I've always been a morning person as well, so I think that's why doing breakfast radio really suited me.I used to be awake early and I would have talked to the milkman and the postman.I used to get the postman to take letters to my friend who lived around the corner. I'd be like, "Take this to Christine's house, please".A. Making a career change when I was 33. I was very late to radio - I didn't start until I was 39. I had no experience or training in media and I took a career break from my job.I was working in marketing at the time, which is sort of where Quirky Weddings came from.A friend of mine was working in a radio station and I'd always wanted to do voiceovers (because) people had told me that I had a really distinctive voice.My friend got a guy at the station to bring me in and let me have a go at it and I was good at it.I just built on it from there and it kept growing and growing until I eventually took my career break.I did loads of voiceovers, then I worked at QVC in London for a while. I was what they called a guest expert and I represented kitchen brands.I would go over there and sell kettles and toasters. I did a show on RTE and other bits too.Then, at the same time, my business partner Saima had a gym in Finaghy and I worked there doing marketing for her.We became really good friends and then we started Quirky Weddings.It was only supposed to be a website, but then it mushroomed out of control, so Saima sold her gym and focused on Quirky Weddings.I got the job at Q Radio in 2015. People laughed at me when I said I was going to be on TV and radio, so I'm proud I made it happen.A. Whenever I was at school, the attitude was that if you were good at science, you should do medicine or pharmacy. If you were good at English, then you should study law.There was no in between. I don't remember them ever saying there's also business studies or whatever else.I did chemistry, physics and biology and never explored any other subjects.I ended up studying psychology at university, weirdly enough, and I hated it.I had to choose a module from another subject in first year and a friend who was a year above me recommended a certain business course.I remember sitting in the lectures in the first couple of weeks and thinking, "Why have I never studied this? I love this."It really struck a chord with me, so I quit the psychology course because I wanted to study business.I regret not choosing A-levels that better suited the path I'm on now, but opportunities in media weren't the same then as they are today.A. It's not as strong as a phobia, but I'm terrified of spiders. Yesterday morning I got out of the shower, looked in the mirror and there was a spider on my neck.A. Easter eggs. I buy them well after Easter when they're on sale. The Co-op in Finaghy sells them and I go in and say to the guy, "I know you've got Easter eggs out the back. Please will you go get them?" I'm just obsessed with Easter eggs. It feels good eating them all year round.A. My cats, Teddy and Mindy. I got Mindy last year and the breeder, six vets and the judges in a cat show all thought that Mindy was a girl - "she" even won prizes.Then I took Mindy to get spayed and the vet rang me and said, "You've just dropped Mindy off to get spayed, but we've found testicles." Mindy Rosebud is a boy.A. Flying was another one of my phobias, but then I read Flying with Confidence and it helped me get on a plane.That's had the biggest impact on my life if you think about it practically.It's written by a pilot and a psychologist, so the pilot talks you through the different noises and turbulence, and the psychologist talks you through the science of fear and why your body tells you that there's something to be afraid of while your brain tells you that there isn't.I bring it onto flights with me.I actually had to buy a second copy because one time I was on a plane and there was a girl in the row behind me hyperventilating and crying during the whole flight.I handed her the book and said, "Read this".A. I would love if we could all live a week as if we lived in the Nineties again.Lockdown gives you time to think about things and I was thinking about the way my life was in the Nineties.We didn't have phones and all that. When you wanted to entertain yourself by having company, you went to your friend's house and you all sat and talked to each other.It was just a simpler time and I felt more connected then than I do now.I would like everyone to remember that, or for those who weren't born in the Nineties to be able to experience that.

. Wasted opportunities. Quite often I've seen people who have been given an opportunity to do something or go somewhere and they've not used it because they've been afraid, couldn't be bothered or didn't see it for the opportunity it was.A. Stephen (Clements). He always encouraged me and he would never let me do something half-heartedly.He would always be like, "No, we can do that again".He encouraged me to be on my game and always moving forward - he was really good in that way. And just his friendship as well... always having that person.A. Stephen obviously, because I miss him.Then, David Meade, the mentalist. I've been in his company before and I absolutely love him.He's one of those people who when you've been in his company and you leave, you feel motivated, uplifted and energised. He could read your mind and know what to bring.And Princess Diana. I have such a fascination with her and her life story. I would just love to talk to her.What a life she lived!A. The best revenge is living well. If you've been wronged or someone has told you that you can't do something, you turn your back and walk away but you make yourself better.A. I love darts. I don't watch many sports, but I watch darts. My friend Elaine is a really big sports fan. For her hen party in 2016, she wanted to go to darts matches in Blackpool. Most people go to Marbella or Portugal, but Elaine wanted to go to the darts - and everybody loved it. I had no idea what I was getting myself into, but it was just class.A. There's a poem called The Guesthouse and it's about your emotions coming to see you and what they are. With losing Stephen and then lockdown, I've kind of been alone with my thoughts a lot more.Lockdown has been good and bad because I'm more aware of my feelings as I'm not out working and doing things. At the same time, I needed to be aware because I have so much to process. The Guesthouse is a positive poem because it encourages you to not be afraid of emotion, but to feel it and send it on its way. It's a nice way to think about mental health.A. When Stephen and I did the Christmas lights switch-on at Belfast City Hall in 2018. We were all buzzing. It was a lovely night and it felt like a real achievement.A. Losing Stephen, which has been well-documented. That's the thing - it was just so public. It made it easier and harder because when I was sitting with my hairdresser crying my eyes out, nobody asked why, but at the same time, it meant that it was everywhere for me too.It was such a shock because it seemed like he had everything. When he left Q Radio, it was hard on my own.I went through months of people asking me if I missed Stephen or them saying they missed hearing us together on air.Then it turned to a completely different level in January, when he died.That's why I haven't been doing much on social media. I just wanted to hide.I'm working on a podcast now about mental health which I should be able to launch soon.I've got the first episode done in which I talk about losing Stephen and the impact that it had on me.Since he died, I've been getting messages from people almost every day about suicide, whether it's about a loved one doing it or trying to do it... any scenario really.A lot of them are reaching out because they see me hurt and they relate. That human kindness really blew my mind.That's why I thought I should do a podcast because it's clear that people want to hear about it and talk about the subject of mental health.I interviewed Siobhan O'Neill, who was recently appointed interim Mental Health Champion for Northern Ireland.Stephen didn't reach out to me to tell me how he was feeling, but if he had, what would I have said? We all say "It's good to talk", but what if you're the person they talk to?Siobhan talks about what you might need to know if you're ever in that situation.A. I have this amazing friend called Ryan Milligan, who is a doctor of astrophysics. He's from Ardglass but he works for Nasa and he's a truck driver as well. He did a show a while ago on BBC called Space Truckers.After school, he wasn't sure what he wanted to study, so he went travelling around the world. Once he came back from his world travels, he decided he wanted to study astrophysics, and we were all like, "Aye, good luck with that".But he did really well and Nasa paid for him to do a PhD. He went over to live in Washington and worked at a space centre for 10 years.The day before he was going, we were sitting in a bar looking at the letter from Nasa and saying, "Holy s***, you're going to work for Nasa". He was like, "Yeah, five years ago I was working in a fish factory thinking that was going to be my whole life".It just made me think, "If he can go and work for Nasa, I can go and do what I want".That's what motivated me to change my career - he really inspired me.A. I want to get back into gear and do things, but I also want to give myself some time. I can't really see what's next because of lockdown, but I do just want to get back to doing more of what I love doing, which is radio. I suppose my ambition is to get back to normal.A. Be positive and let go of trying to control things.A. As someone who made people feel loved and important." , "isAccessibleForFree": "False", "hasPart": { "@type": "WebPageElement", "isAccessibleForFree": "False","cssSelector": "#flip-pay"} }

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UK news Rachel Dean's Big Ask: U105 presenter Cate Conway on losing Stephen Clements and how he was her biggest influence last news


UK news Rachel Dean's Big Ask: U105 presenter Cate Conway on losing Stephen Clements and how he was her biggest influence last news


UK news Rachel Dean's Big Ask: U105 presenter Cate Conway on losing Stephen Clements and how he was her biggest influence last news


UK news Rachel Dean's Big Ask: U105 presenter Cate Conway on losing Stephen Clements and how he was her biggest influence last news

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