Uk news PM unveils post-lockdown plan as death toll rises by 43 - LIVE London news

MetiNews.Com - Boris Johnson has unveiled the UK's post-lockdown recovery plan in a major speech, but warned that the dangers of coronavirus "have not gone away".

Uk news PM unveils post-lockdown plan as death toll rises by 43 - LIVE London news

MetiNews.Com - Boris Johnson has unveiled the UK's post-lockdown recovery plan in a major speech, but warned that the dangers of coronavirus "have not gone away".

Uk news  PM unveils post-lockdown plan as death toll rises by 43 - LIVE London news
30 June 2020 - 13:40

Breaking News ! ES News email The latest headlines in your inbox twice a day Monday - Friday plus breaking news updates Enter your email address Continue Please enter an email address Email address is invalid Fill out this field Email address is invalid You already have an account. Please log in. Register with your social account or click here to log in I would like to receive lunchtime headlines Monday - Friday plus breaking news alerts, by email Update newsletter preferences Boris Johnson has unveiled the UK's post-lockdown recovery plan in a major speech, but warned that the dangers of coronavirus "have not gone away". Speaking in the West Midlands, the PM pledged to "unleash" the potential of the UK. He said the Government is "determined to use this crisis finally to tackle this country’s great unresolved challenges of the last three decades", pledging "radical" reforms to the planning system and promising an "infrastructure revolution". It comes as the hospital death toll in the UK rose by 43 on Tuesday, while figures from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) show that excess deaths in England and Wales have fallen below the five-year average for the first time since March. Meanwhile as Leicester heads back into lockdown, secondary schools in England could reportedly create "year bubbles" of up to 240 pupils under Government plans to ensure all children can return to the classroom safely in September. Live Updates New updates availableRefresh 2020-06-30T13:29:16.246Z Just in: Public Health Wales said a further three people had died after testing positive for Covid-19, taking the total number of deaths to 1,510, while the total number of cases in Wales increased by 24 to 15,743. 2020-06-30T13:10:42.616Z Dozens of leading figures from London’s restaurants and clubs have written to Boris Johnson and Sadiq Khan demanding urgent action to save the capital from remaining a “ghost town” for the rest of the year...Restaurant bosses warn of West End collapse without government helpIn a strongly worded letter, they warn that “immediate action must be taken” to prevent huge job losses and help the capital to lead the national economic recovery out of the worst recession on record. 2020-06-30T12:45:24.593Z Leicester Mayor calls for more data from the Government on coronavirus testingSpeaking after a phone call with the Prime Minister, Leicester mayor Sir Peter Soulsby told reporters: “I told him it would actually be enormously helpful to have, amongst the data that was collected as part of the testing process, the ethnicity of the people that were tested and where it is available, and where it is appropriate, their place of work.“I think he took that point. Certainly in a city like Leicester, it’s important to know whether it’s particular neighbourhoods or communities being affected.“Knowing the address is important, knowing the ethnicity is certainly something that may give you a clue as to how the spread has taken place, and if there is a place of work… those pieces of information help us to pinpoint where the issues might be.”Asked if Boris Johnson had apologised to him over the nationally-run system that had “let Leicester down”, Sir Peter said: “I didn’t press him for anything of that sort.“What I wanted to do was take the opportunity to make sure that the data we get is something that can be very useful at a local level.“I made those very limited points and he seems to have taken them on board.” Advertisement 2020-06-30T12:35:46.910Z Downing Street said there were no plans for Health Secretary Matt Hancock to hold a press conference on the Leicester lockdown following a demand from Labour.The Prime Minister’s official spokesman said: “No current plans for that.”The spokesman said Mr Hancock went to the Commons after the decision had been made and took questions then and during a media round, as had the PM at his speech.“So I do think both nationally and locally steps have been taken to ensure that people have all the information they need,” the spokesman said. 2020-06-30T12:28:20.813Z Downing Street was unable to say whether Boris Johnson has met his pledge to complete all Covid-19 tests within 24 hours by the end of June.The Prime Minister’s official spokesman said: “We said that was something that we wanted to achieve by the end of the month and we’re talking to Department of Health and Social Care about how we can make that data available.“We’ve been working to turn around those test results as quickly as possible but I don’t have those figures for you.” 2020-06-30T12:19:32.633Z Employers in Leicester will be able to re-furloughDowning Street has said employers in areas placed in local lockdown such as Leicester will be able to re-furlough staff if they have used the scheme before.The Prime Minister’s official spokesman said: “If employers have used the furlough scheme at any point between March 1 and June 30, which of course many will have, they can re-furlough those employees from July 1.“If someone worked in non-essential retail and they have been able to go back to work and that non-essential retail now has to close again they will still be eligible to benefit from the furlough scheme.“It applies nationwide but obviously it’s a particular circumstance to Leicester and those surrounding conurbations at the moment.” Advertisement 2020-06-30T12:11:53.033Z Sturgeon pays tribute to 100 days of hard sacrificeNicola Sturgeon insisted Covid-19 was “just as infectious and just as dangerous as it ever was”.She warned: “It will come back hard if we let it.”The First Minister told Scots: “We are right now in a potentially very dangerous moment.“We are reopening more public services and more businesses, we will soon start travelling a bit more and we will also start seeing more of our family and friends, including in outdoor pubs and restaurants.“That is absolutely right, it is justified by the progress we have made. And it is important to get our economy going again.“But by opening up a bit more at a time when the daily statistics are looking so positive there is a real risk that people will let down their guard, it is a human reaction that all of us may be susceptible to.“There is a danger it will seem as if life is getting back to normal, and I want to stress that life right now can’t and shouldn’t get completely back to normal because the virus is still there.”She said the reduction in both cases and deaths from Covid-19 were the result of “100 days of hard sacrifice” over lockdown  2020-06-30T12:03:57.433Z Only nine Scottish Covid-19 deaths in one weekNicola Sturgeon said in the previous seven days there had been a total of nine Covid deaths in Scotland, compared to 23 in the week prior to that.“That is a sustained and significant ongoing reduction,” she stated.Speaking 100 days after lockdown was imposed, the First Minister spoke about the progress that had been made – although she said “for most of us” the period of restrictions “probably feels a lot longer than that”.When restrictions were first imposed on March 23, she said: “Covid was starting to run out of control in Scotland.“Because of that two weeks after the start of lockdown in early April hospital admissions for the virus averaged over 200 every single day.“Two weeks after that Covid deaths in Scotland, going by the wider National Records of Scotland data, were on average more than 90 every single day.“To be in our current position with hospital admissions averaging just four a day, with consistently low numbers of new Covid cases, and with such a sharp reduction in death rates, all of that is massive and it is very welcome progress.” 2020-06-30T11:57:43.340Z Professor Stephen Powis outlines how NHS would deal with second waveOn how the NHS would deal with a potential second wave of Covid-19, Professor Stephen Powis said there would be a "similarity in approach but building on the lessons we have learnt".He told the Health and Social Care Committee: "We are beginning to see outbreaks and localised increases in transmission rates, and I think the task there is for local NHS planners to ensure that they know that there may be a possibility locally of that occurring and therefore they can make a local plan."He said at a national level there would be considerations of reusing the Nightingale hospitals, the use of the independent sector for additional capacity and the usage of ICU beds."One of our priorities, if there was a second wave, would be to manage that in a way that we would not have to stand down routine services in quite the way that we had to do in April," he said. Advertisement 2020-06-30T11:48:57.993Z No data on whether sweatshop factories in Leicester are 'hotspots' for virus, city mayor saysLeicester mayor Sir Peter Soulsby said he had not had data on whether sweatshop factories in the east of the city had seen "hotspots" for the virus.He said there was an issue with "illegal manufacturers" in Leicester but added: "There’s nothing we’ve seen that it (the spread of coronavirus) could be associated with them." 2020-06-30T11:46:26.210Z Three deaths reported in ScotlandThree deaths have been reported in Scotland, after no deaths from patients with a positive test had been registered for four days running.The total number of patients who have died now stands at 2,485.Despite the deaths recorded today the weekly figures show a “sustained and significant ongoing reduction”, Nicola Sturgeon said.

.A total of 885 patients are in Scottish hospitals with confirmed or suspected Covid-19, up 145 in 24 hours, she added, stressing the increase was all in suspected cases.Of these, 19 are intensive care, a rise of nine, again all in suspected cases. 2020-06-30T11:41:19.220Z NHS England took 'eye off the ball' on infection prevention at beginning of pandemic - Jeremy HuntFormer health secretary Jeremy Hunt said NHS England took its "eye off the ball" on infection prevention and control in healthcare settings earlier on in the pandemic.Mr Hunt, chairman of the Health and Social Care Committee, said by the end of April around 20 per cent of all infections were happening in healthcare settings.He told the committee that it was not until May 18 that the official NHS England and Public Health England guidance on infection prevention and control was updated to include the two-metre social distancing rule, which he deemed "too late".Professor Stephen Powis, national medical director at NHS England, denied this, stating: "That document was largely bringing together a group of existing guidance and measures, so it was providing further clarification to healthcare providers."He said the figure of 20 per cent had come from a limited study looking at infections after five days in hospital, at which point it was not clear due to the incubation period whether it was a community or hospital-based infection.Mr Hunt said: "What it looks like from the outside, because you were focused on one very important risk, namely hospitals being overwhelmed Lombardy-style, we took the eye off the ball on infections in healthcare settings." Advertisement 2020-06-30T11:32:09.636Z Extra police officers will be deployed in London when pubs reopen in case of violent flare-ups, the head of the Metropolitan Police said...Police chief warns extra officers will be on the street as pubs reopenCommissioner Dame Cressida Dick said the force has been planning for July 4 “for some time” and the public will see “a lot” of officers on the capital's streets. 2020-06-30T11:28:38.826Z Leicester mayor 'very, very concerned' about impact of coronavirus in cityLeicester city mayor Sir Peter Soulsby told a press conference that testing has increased in the city in recent days and weeks.However, he said some colleagues “have had to spend quite a lot of time persuading the people actually on the ground doing the testing that the Secretary of State said they should stay in Leicester”.He added: “As some of them were on occasions seeking to decamp to go and measure elsewhere.”Sir Peter added: “I’m very, very concerned obviously about the impact on the well-being of the city in general and the health of the people in the city, but also about the economy of the city.“One of the things we’ve been stressing to the Government over recent times is that if Leicester is to be locked down and its economy put in limbo for a little longer, we will need support that was given earlier in the pandemic, throughout the UK, restored here in Leicester.”He told reporters that the local lockdown announced last night "was, I think, more wide-ranging than we’d anticipated"."I’m really grateful for that, because while it is a pain for us and a nuisance for us in the city to be subject to that level of restriction and to have the clock turned back in the development of the virus, it is nonetheless something that has some realistic prospect of being effective," he said.Sir Peter also said that leaders are still trying to learn more about where the virus is in the city, saying: “We do need still to know more about where it is in the community.“I’ve had lots of speculation and lots of questions about where it is in the community and we have not as yet been able to give satisfactory answers even to ourselves, no matter anybody else, about which parts of the community need the intervention.“Which neighbourhoods, which communities, indeed which streets.” 2020-06-30T11:16:55.610Z Questions asked about how often NHS workers should be testedHealth and Social Care Committee chairman Jeremy Hunt asked whether everyone in the NHS and the social care system should be tested once a week or once a fortnight.Sir Simon Stevens, chief executive of NHS England and NHS Improvement, noted that decisions on who should be tested and how frequently have been led by the chief medical officer and Public Health England.He told the committee: “We do however want to see a significant further increase along the timelines you have described. I have discussed this with Dido Harding who is leading the testing and tracing service.“I think the clear intention is to substantially expand testing capacity in the direction you describe.”Sir Simon said: “The aim clearly is by the end of September or October to have significant extra lab capacity so that were the chief medical officer then to recommend a change in the asymptomatic staff testing policy – that would be something that could be delivered.” Advertisement 2020-06-30T11:11:30.086Z 'Big unknown' over extra pressure on mental health care Sir Simon Stevens said there was a “big unknown” over how much extra pressure has been added to the NHS for mental health care as a result of the pandemic.He said the extra capital funding announced by the Prime Minister on Tuesday, of which £1.5 billion will be going to hospitals, will help NHS providers to phase out outdated mental health “dormitory wards”.He told the Health and Social Care Committee: “There is a big unknown as to how much of additional burden of mental ill health there will be coming out of the last four months.”He added: “I think in a nutshell we believe there will be an increased mental health demand but the precise size and shape of it is yet to be determined and seen.”He continued: “One of the things we also know is that too many of the buildings and facilities in which NHS mental health care is being delivered are out of date and need a significant upgrade.“And that’s why one of the things I have been personally pushing, and really pleased that the Prime Minister’s announcement today [Tuesday] gives effect to, is capital investment to phase out altogether so-called mental health dormitory wards.” 2020-06-30T11:06:17.960Z Three-quarters of employees would like to split their week to spend half the time in the office and half working remotely, new research shows...Three-quarters of workers want split between home and the officeThe survey of 1,000 workers based in countries around the world revealed three-quarters — or 74 per cent — of employees wanted a mix of office-based and remote working.  2020-06-30T11:01:44.940Z Government will take 'draconian steps' to stem coronavirus outbreaksBoris Johnson said he had always made it clear he would take “draconian steps” to “put on the brakes” where there were flare-ups of coronavirus.Speaking in Dudley, the Prime Minister defended the NHS Test and Trace system.He said: “We are testing now almost double per head what most other European countries are doing.“We have got a testing capacity of 280,000 a day and testing is a huge part of that whack-a-mole strategy and will continue to be intensified.”The PM said: “I think most people across the country do understand, and do remember that as we come out of this I always said that there were going to be local flare-ups, and that we will deal with them locally – and that’s what we are doing in Leicester, and we will do it elsewhere.“It worked in places like Ashford, or Weston-Super-Mare, in Leicester it’s gone out more into the community and we need to take the steps that we have.” Advertisement 2020-06-30T10:47:28.186Z Fresh lockdown measures in Leicester 'very disruptive', MP saysNeil O’Brien, Conservative MP for Harborough, Oadby & Wigston on the outskirts of Leicester, called the new lockdown  “very disruptive and everyone wishes it wasn’t happening” but welcomed the measures to help slow the area’s outbreak.When asked whether he thought people would stick to the rules as other areas open up, Mr O’Brien told the PA news agency: “I think that people in Leicester and Leicestershire have got good common sense, they have been told that there is a deadly virus in danger of taking off in the city and I think that people will respect that and respond to it.”On why the area was experiencing high levels of cases, Mr O’Brien said: “I haven’t seen a clear or definitive explanation for why Leicester is as badly affected as it is, there are probably a lot of different factors in play. We will be trying to get to the bottom of it obviously.”He added: “Leicester like a lot of other places that have had severe outbreaks has a lot of multi-generational households.“That creates a risk because you have older vulnerable people living with working people so we need to take extra care in Leicester and Leicestershire.” 2020-06-30T10:34:19.763Z Boris Johnson sets out a 'new deal' for Britain...PM sets out 'new deal': Let's build people up not tear statues downMr Johnson said he will follow in the footsteps of president Franklin D Roosevelt, who led the US out of the Great Depression in the 1930s, by investing in infrastructure projects to help stimulate the nation’s recovery from the coronavirus pandemic. Next

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Uk news PM unveils post-lockdown plan as death toll rises by 43 - LIVE London news


Uk news PM unveils post-lockdown plan as death toll rises by 43 - LIVE London news


Uk news PM unveils post-lockdown plan as death toll rises by 43 - LIVE London news


Uk news PM unveils post-lockdown plan as death toll rises by 43 - LIVE London news

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