Daily uk news Covid-19 cases among people in their 40s and 50s have risen by 90% since the end of August - while the number of patients being admitted to hospital has DOUBLED in just nine days, official figures show MetiNews.Com

MetiNews.Com - Public Health England (PHE) data reveals 23.4 cases are now diagnosed for every 100,000 people aged between 40 and 49 - up from 12.4 at the end of August. 

Daily uk news Covid-19 cases among people in their 40s and 50s have risen by 90% since the end of August - while the number of patients being admitted to hospital has DOUBLED in just nine days, official figures show MetiNews.Com

MetiNews.Com - Public Health England (PHE) data reveals 23.4 cases are now diagnosed for every 100,000 people aged between 40 and 49 - up from 12.4 at the end of August. 

Daily uk news  Covid-19 cases among people in their 40s and 50s have risen by 90% since the end of August - while the number of patients being admitted to hospital has DOUBLED in just nine days, official figures show MetiNews.Com
16 September 2020 - 08:33

Breaking News ! Covid-19 cases are soaring among middle-aged people in England and have soared by upwards of 90 per cent in a fortnight as the outbreak continues to grow, official figures show.Public Health England (PHE) data reveals 23.4 cases are now diagnosed for every 100,000 people aged between 40 and 49 — up from 12.4 at the end of August. And coronavirus infection rates have nearly doubled in just a week for people in their fifties, jumping from 10.9 to 20.The most up-to-date PHE data, which was released on Friday, clearly shows cases are spiralling across every age group. People in their twenties — who aren't as vulnerable to the disease and are likely to escape death or serious illness — are driving the spike with an infection rate of 46, which has doubled in the last three weeks.Fears of a second wave are growing as the number of Britons being diagnosed with Covid-19 each day has topped 3,000 for the first time since May. Ministers have also been spooked by spiralling outbreaks in Spain and France and rising hospital admissions.Hospital admissions — another way of measuring the severity of the pandemic — have doubled in England over the past ten days. More than 150 newly-infected patients required NHS treatment on Sunday, up from a rolling seven-day average of 52 on the last day of August. But government officials believe a second wave of Covid-19 in Britain would not be nearly as bad as the first — which killed between 40 and 55,000 people — because we are better at containing and treating the virus now.The experts believe a combination of local lockdowns, social distancing measures and medical breakthroughs would substantially reduce both the death rate and number of cases. Public Health England (PHE) data reveals 23.4 cases are now diagnosed for every 100,000 people aged between 40 and 49 — up from 12.4 at the end of August. And coronavirus infection rates have nearly doubled in just a week for people in their fifties, jumping from 10.9 to 20. Week 36 ends September 6 Hospital admissions — another way of measuring the severity of the pandemic — have doubled in England over the past ten days. More than 150 newly-infected patients required NHS treatment on Sunday, up from a rolling seven-day average of 56 the week before RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Huge queues build up outside Covid-19 test centres across... UK records 3,105 more Covid-19 cases and 27 new deaths -... Chinese virologist who fled to the US after claiming... Top Oxford professor behind Covid-19 vaccine reiterates... What's REALLY behind Britain's testing fiasco? How... Desperate NHS bosses may hire STUDENTS to fill staffing... Share this article Share SECOND WAVE WON'T BE AS BAD, GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS CLAIM  A second wave of Covid-19 in Britain would not be nearly as bad as the first because we are better at containing and treating the virus now, Government officials have claimed. One reason for this prediction is the fact that we now know so much more about the virus. This includes medical advances, such as the discovery that steroid treatment dexamethasone can cut the risk of death from coronavirus by a third.Officials also say that local lockdowns – and the beleaguered test and trace service – have successfully prevented recent outbreaks from spreading more widely.Nonetheless, they stress that it is wrong to assume that the virus is only circulating among the young. While many new cases are patients aged between 17 and 21, the latest statistics show infection rates for those in their 50s and 60s are now as high as they were for those in their 20s several weeks ago. adverts.addToArray({"pos":"mpu_factbox"})Advertisement PHE figures released on Friday, which offers the most detailed insight into the state of the coronavirus crisis in England, revealed how people in their twenties are driving the current outbreak.The infection rate for those aged 20-29 has risen from 23.5 cases for every 100,000 people in the week ending August 16 to 46 in the most recent full week of data, which finished on September 6.The rate is now 29.8 for people in their 30s, up from 19.6 the week before and 16.4 at the end of August. And it has jumped to 23.4 for 40 to 49-year-olds, up from 13.5 in the previous seven-day spell and 12.4 at the end of last month. Infections rates have risen from 10.9 to 20 in the space of a week for people in their 50s, and have jumped from 7.5 to 12.4 for those in their sixties. Cases are also rising for people over the age of 70, who are the most vulnerable to the disease because of their age. Infection rates have jumped from 4.6 to 7.

.9 to 12.9 for those 80 or older.For children, rates have jumped from 5.6 to 7.7 for those up to the age of four, and have risen from 5.1 to 8.1 among 10 to 19-year-olds. Hospital admissions have also risen over the same time-frame, according to data published by the Department of Health.Government statistics show 153 newly-infected patients needed NHS care in England on Sunday, September 13. Similar data has not yet been released for Monday or yesterday. For comparison, 85 patients were admitted to hospital in England last Sunday.The rolling seven-day average of hospital admissions — considered one of the best ways to analyse trends — shows the rate has risen from 52.43 on the last day of August to 127.57 on September 13. The rate topped 100 on September 10 and was 72 last Sunday. Hopes of fighting a second wave are also high because vaccines could be available as early as next spring, with a 'long pipeline' of promising jabs being trialled.In addition, early signs from the southern hemisphere indicate that any flu outbreak will be less severe than in previous years.It comes as top Belgium scientist Jean-Luc Gala said Belgium's rising infection rate is 'completely normal' and ongoing lockdown measures should be relaxed. He told French-language newspaper La Dernière Heure that 'people no longer suffer from the coronavirus, but measures to stop it.'He said people should not worry as the virus 'is circulating in a category that does not suffer from it, young people who will at worst have small symptoms, at best nothing at all'. He said people who the virus only midly affects becoming infected is beneficial as it contributes to wide-spread immunity. Ministers had been concerned that a combination of flu and corona cases would prove catastrophic for the NHS this winter.However, officials also expect that advice on hygiene and social distancing during the corona pandemic will suppress flu rates – as will the trend for working from home and avoiding public transport. In Australia and New Zealand – which typically provide good indicators of how the flu will develop in the UK – cases have remained low compared with last year.Officials still believe the next six months 'will be very tricky' for the NHS and the country as a whole – but their cautious optimism provides a marked contrast to recent warnings from doctors' unions and medical colleges, which have claimed that hospitals would be unable to cope with a second wave.A survey by the British Medical Association this week found that 86 per cent of doctors expect coronavirus to surge again over the next six months.    When Spain, France and Belgium hit 18 cases per 100,000 (which the UK did at the start of September) they then saw admissions increase by up to four-fold. But Belgium was able to reduce its hospital rate by reintroducing tough measures In August the hospitalisation rate in Belgium doubled from one per 100,000 to two per 100,000, but it has since been squashed Hospitalisation rates remain low and falling in the UK, from a peak of more than 30 per 100,000 people to fewer than one per 100,000, but officials fear they will rise again soon PARENTS, TEACHERS AND CHILDREN WILL GO TO THE BACK OF THE QUEUE FOR COVID TESTS Parents, teachers and children face being put to the back of the queue for Covid tests as Matt Hancock admitted yesterday swabs will have to be rationed.In a humiliating climbdown, the Health Secretary said a 'priority list' would ensure environments such as care homes and hospitals would have enough.However, it comes at the expense of millions of others, with warnings issued that the UK was being put into 'lockdown by default' as a result of the shortage of tests.Hundreds of schools have been partially or completely closed because of coronavirus cases - both proven and suspected - leading to fears of a domino effect, resulting in parents not being able to go to work and the return of empty offices.More than one in 10 children were not in classes last Thursday, figures show, as the National Governance Association claims the growing number of pupils and staff awaiting tests could cripple parent confidence in getting their children back to school.  adverts.addToArray({"pos":"mpu_factbox"})Advertisement However, Government officials believe that while cases are on the rise again, the curve will be flatter when compared with March and April.One reason for this prediction is the fact that we now know so much more about the virus. This includes medical advances, such as the discovery that steroid treatment dexamethasone can cut the risk of death from coronavirus by a third.Officials also say that local lockdowns – and the beleaguered test and trace service – have successfully prevented recent outbreaks from spreading more widely.Nonetheless, they stress that it is wrong to assume that the virus is only circulating among the young. While many new cases are patients aged between 17 and 21, the latest statistics show infection rates for those in their 50s and 60s are now as high as they were for those in their 20s several weeks ago.Figures from the Department of Health yesterday showed there were 3,105 new coronavirus cases in the last 24 hours, compared with around 5,000 a day at the height of the crisis. There were another 27 deaths, up from nine recorded on Tuesday.A special envoy from the World Health Organisation yesterday said the 'grotesque' global outlook was 'much worse than any science fiction'.Appearing before the Foreign Affairs Committee, Dr David Nabarro told MPs: 'It's a terrible situation... a health issue has got so out of control it's knocking the world into not just a recession but a huge economic contraction, which would probably double the number of poor people, double the number of malnourished [and] lead to hundreds of millions of small businesses going bankrupt.' SWEDEN AND US DATA SUGGEST DEATHS MAY NOT FOLLOW CASES SURGE  Evidence from Sweden and America suggests that Britain may avoid a second wave of coronavirus deaths despite a rebound in infections.  The UK's rise of of 21,300 cases in the last week - more than double the figure of 8,700 two weeks ago - has sparked fears that Britain is following in the footsteps of France and Spain which have both seen alarming spikes in virus cases. But despite warnings from the WHO that Europe's death toll is likely to mount in the autumn, experts hope that the second peak will be less deadly because patients are typically younger and doctors are better prepared for the disease. In Sweden, the death rate has been falling steadily since April despite a peak of cases in the summer - with the country's top epidemiologist saying that deaths can be kept low without drastic lockdown measures. France recorded its highest-ever spike in cases with more than 10,000 on Saturday, but deaths are nowhere near the mid-April peak and the country's PM says it must 'succeed in living with this virus' without going back into lockdown.  In the United States, cases surged to record levels in July and August after the first wave had receded - but death rates in summer hotspots such as Texas and Florida were well below those in New York City where the virus hit hardest in the spring.In Sweden, which raised eyebrows around the world by keeping shops and restaurants open throughout the pandemic, deaths have been falling since April.  There are fears that the UK will experience a rise in the number of people dying of coronavirus as a direct result of cases surging. But data shows otherwise – the US has almost completely avoided a second wave in Covid-19 deaths despite seeing a huge increase in the number of people infected since June Despite seeing a new surge in coronavirus infections, Sweden has recorded a continuing fall in fatalities since the start of MayOnly 11 new deaths were announced last week, down from a peak of 752 fatalities in seven days in mid-April. Cases reached their height in Sweden in the second half of June, when some days saw more than 1,000 infections - but the death toll continued to fall regardless. Sweden's state epidemiologist Anders Tegnell, who has become the face of the no-lockdown strategy, said in a recent interview that voluntary hygiene measures had been 'just as effective' as complete shutdowns. 'The rapidly declining cases we see in Sweden right now is another indication that you can get the number of cases down quite a lot in a country without having a complete lockdown,' he told Unherd. Tegnell added that 'deaths are not so closely connected to the amount of cases you have in a country', saying the death rate was more closely linked to whether older people are being infected and how well the health system can cope. 'Those things will influence mortality a lot more, I think, than the actual spread of the disease,' he said. adverts.addToArray({"pos":"mpu_factbox"})Advertisement

Source = MetiNews.Com

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Daily uk news Covid-19 cases among people in their 40s and 50s have risen by 90% since the end of August - while the number of patients being admitted to hospital has DOUBLED in just nine days, official figures show MetiNews.Com


Daily uk news Covid-19 cases among people in their 40s and 50s have risen by 90% since the end of August - while the number of patients being admitted to hospital has DOUBLED in just nine days, official figures show MetiNews.Com


Daily uk news Covid-19 cases among people in their 40s and 50s have risen by 90% since the end of August - while the number of patients being admitted to hospital has DOUBLED in just nine days, official figures show MetiNews.Com


Daily uk news Covid-19 cases among people in their 40s and 50s have risen by 90% since the end of August - while the number of patients being admitted to hospital has DOUBLED in just nine days, official figures show MetiNews.Com

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